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Posts Tagged ‘Patriotic’

Tellin’ it like it is..

18 Aug

I received the following via email earlier today and personally speaking, I agree with the content of said message completely. Yes, I’ll be called a racist or bigoted, prejudiced, a hate-monger, what-have-you for spreading the sentiment but I’m fed up with the attitude of some in our country today.

I’ve never served in the armed forces but I’m fully behind those who do. (Furthermore, if a country were to wage war on us, here within our own borders, I’d be willing to enlist — though at my age, today, I doubt they’d want me.) The point being that I’m proud of our country; I may not be happy with some of the politics that pervade Washington, or even our capitals at the state level but I’m proud of what our country stands for nonetheless! I feel that anyone immigrating into the U.S.A. should be just as proud of our nation … and if you’re not, you’re damn well welcome to pack your eff’ing bags and go back to whence you came from.

Here’s the email I received. If you agree, please feel free to copy and past the content and forward to your friends — or just send them the link to this blog entry.


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The Plight of the Homeless

10 Jul

Photo depiction of Gustus-BozarthIf or when you ever gave a thought to the homeless, what was going through your mind? Do you think of them as being lazy and mentally deficient; people whose only interest is in standing on a street corner and panhandling for money? Perhaps you saw a man sitting in a wheelchair, or standing on a pair of crutches with one leg amputated at the knee and thought, “What is his story?”

What rarely crosses our mind (but perhaps we’d do well to remember) is a simple phrase, “There but for the grace of God go I.

More and more families are realizing that they are only one paycheck away from joining the Middle Class homeless population.


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Why the American Flag "appears" to be backwards…

16 Jul

I have often wondered why the American flag, when sewn on to a service member’s right sleeve, always has the “appearance” of being backwards (field of stars to the right instead of to the left). I’d noticed this on a number of photos over the years and sometimes even wondered if those [photos] were possibly not genuine; just PhotoShop’ed depictions in order to make a point.

Photo of flag on soldier's right sleeveI even dug out my old uniform which I’d worn in the Boy Scouts many years ago and though the flag was affixed to the right sleeve it appeared with the field of blue and stars leading on the left. That made me think all the more that something just wasn’t right with the photos I’d seen where it appeared to be backwards so I did a little research on the Internet. Now I have my answer and thought I’d share it with others who might be curious.

According to WikiAnswers.com, “The flag is worn with the appearance of being backwards on soldiers RIGHT arm to symbolize early American armies which had a flag carrier holding our flag high (which looks backwards from one side while correct from the other). The “backwards” flag signifies this and gives the perception that every soldier is carrying a flag. Left arm patches are correctly laid.”

Another source, About.com: US Military, states the following:

The full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is worn so that the star field faces forward, or to the flag’s own right. When worn in this manner, the flag is facing to the observer’s right, and gives the effect of the flag flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward.

The rule dates back to the Army’s early history, when both mounted cavalry and infantry units would designate a standard bearer, who carried the Colors into battle. As he charged, his forward momentum caused the flag to stream back. Since the Stars and Stripes are mounted with the canton closest to the pole, that section stayed to the right, while the stripes flew to the left.

So there you have it! The reason why the flag appears backwards on the uniforms of service members (and ballplayers for that matter).

Namaste,
Michael

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